Textile Dictionary 
 
Miscellaneous Fibres
 

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Alginate
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: Alginate was first produced from seaweed in 1940. It is a product of a neutralizing reaction between alginic acid and caustic soda. It is non-flammable. When combined with other fibres, it takes on a sheer appearance.
Uses:Garnishing, camouflage and netting.
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Amazon
Fibre:
Weave: Satin
Characteristics: It is very soft.
Uses:
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Charmeuse
Fibre:
Weave: Satin
Characteristics: Originated as a French lightweight silk that was recognized for it's supreme luster and drapability. Today it is made out of rayon, cotton and manufactured fibres and has a dull back. It is found in a variety of solids and prints.
Uses:Pajamas, dresses, and draping gowns.
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Crinoline
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It is a very loosely woven fibre with high rigidity. It is smooth, stiff, and has excellent strength. It's comes in a variety of shades from white to black.
Uses: Stiffening, making interlining for hat shapes.
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Eolienne
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: It's name comes from the term Eolus, which is Greek for God of Winds. This airy fibre has a low thread count and is very delicate. It is lightweight and is very lustrous.
Uses:
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Eskimo Cloth
Fibre:
Weave: Satin or Twill
Characteristics: It is an over-coating with a thick nap. It is usually dyed so as to create wide stripes.
Uses: Over-coating.
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Etamine
Fibre:
Weave: Twill
Characteristics: It was originally made of wool, cotton or linen and used for sifting. It is now a worsted fabric with a very short nap and light in weight.
Uses: Clothing.
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Gattar
Fibre:
Weave: Satin
Characteristics: It is made with a cotton filling and a silk warp. It is only found in solid colours and is known for it's elegant luster and excellent drapability.
Uses: Elegant evening wraps.
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Georgette
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: Usually done in silk but can also be found in manufactured fibres. It is characterized by it's crispness, body and outstanding durability. It is sheer and has a dull face.
Uses:
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Granada
Fibre:
Weave: Twill
Characteristics: It's name is derived from the Latin word Granum, which refers to the grainy quality of the textile. This granular quality is achieved by a broken twill weave. It is made of a cotton warp and alpaca or mohair filling. This fibre is exceptionally fine.
Uses:
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Grenadine
Fibre:
Weave: Leno
Characteristics: This fine fibre originated in Italy. It can be made in various fibres such as cotton, wool, silk or manufactured fibres. It is well know for it's stiffness.
Uses: Women's clothing.
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Henrietta
Fibre:
Weave: Twill
Characteristics: Originally consisted of worsted filling and silk warp. Today, it can be found in a variety of blends. It has excellent drapability. It's weight and quality vary with fibres, however, when created with silk and wool it is lustrous and soft.
Uses: Dress goods.
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Herringbone Twill
Fibre:
Weave: Twill
Characteristics: It was named after the skeleton of the Herring as this is what the fibre pattern resembles. It is usually created in wool and has varying qualities. It is also known as Arrowhead.
Uses: Suitings, top coatings, sports coats.
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Hickory Cloth
Fibre:
Weave: Twill
Characteristics: It is characterized by it's excellent durability. It is warp striped and comes in a variety of colours. It usually is created with cotton.
Uses: Work clothes.
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Honey Comb
Fibre:
Weave: Float
Characteristics: It's name comes from a French word meaning birds nest. It's patterns are regular and open. Honey Comb is found in many fabrics and is also known as Diamond Weave.
Uses: Draperies, jackets and women's clothing.
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Hong Kong
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: This is a ribbed fabric usually found in plain colours. It comes in a variety of qualities but the best type is made out of silk.
Uses:
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Kasha (Casha)
Fibre:
Weave: Twill
Characteristics: Originally made of Vicuna. Today the Vicuna is considered an endangered species so Kasha is made from either a blend of cashmere and wool or a very fine wool.
Uses: Clothing.
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Longcloth
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: It is one fo the first fabrics created in especially long strips. It's luster is moderate but it's quality is fairly high. This cotton and cotton blend fabric is very soft.
Uses:
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Luster Fabric
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It is created using fibres with high luster such as worsted or mohair yarn. Warp threads are used to create this fabric. Cotton is usually the main component, however, sometimes manufactured fibres are used.
Uses:
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Macrame
Fibre:
Weave: knotted lace
Characteristics:Originally made in Arabia but later made in Italy. Used to manufacture shawls and scarfs.
Uses:
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Marble Cloth
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: Originally made of silk and wool. Today it is produced with natural and manufactured fibres.
Uses:
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Marocain
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: It is ribbed with a wavy look, resembling Crepe. It is made of silk, wool and manufactured fibres.
Uses:Suits.
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Marseilles
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics:Named after it's city of origin in France. It is identified by it's raised woven pattern. This double-faced textile has a quilted appearance that is very elegant. usually found in white, but occasionally other colours are used.
Uses:
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Non-Crushable Linen
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It is very versatile and has excellent washability and durability. It is treated so as to create a high resistance to wrinkling. This finish provides greater resilience and elasticity.
Uses:
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Oilcloth
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: Originally, textiles such as cotton were coated in oil to create resistance to moisture. Now, resins from plastics are used instead of oil. Olefin is a very versatile fibre with excellent flexibility.
Uses:Waterproof garments, book bags, belts, bibs, pencil cases, luggage, surgical supplies.

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Ondule
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It's name is derived from a French word meaning wavy. This wavy effect is created by weaving the warp irregularly. It is created in silk, cotton and manufactured fibres.
Uses:
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Osnaberg
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: Osnaberg is characterized by it's strength and durability. It is medium to heavyweight. It is coarse and varies in both colour and print. May or may not be treated with a finish. If it is finished, it is also know as Hopsacking or Crash.
Uses:
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Ottoman
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: Originated in Turkey. Was originally made only in silk. Today it can be found in wool, silk, or manufactured fibres. It is firm and has a high luster. It is characterized by horizontal ribs. Another type of Ottoman with heavy ribbing is also found in Satin Weave.
Uses:
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Pekin
Fibre:
Weave: Novelty
Characteristics: It has a very fine quality. It is characterized by it's vertical stripes of identical width that have equal widths between them. It consists of Cotton, wool, silk, or elaborate velvet stripes that are separated by satin.
Uses:
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Qiviut
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics:The name comes from an Eskimo word meaning 'down'. This fibre is obtained from the Arctic Musk Ox. It is lustrous, soft, durable and free of oils.
Uses:
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Radium
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: Originated in Lyons France. It has high luster and is smooth and soft.
Uses:
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Ratine
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: Originated in Italy. Ratine is a French word that means rough. This fibre has an uneven, pebbled surface. It comes in solid colours and prints and is executed in silk, cotton or wool.
Uses:
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Romaine
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It is a lightweight textile with a low thread count. it is lustrous and has an uneven textural appearance. It was originally made os ilk but is found today in rayon, acetate, wool, silk and manufactured fibres.
Uses:
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Ruche
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics:Fluted or crimped lace or gauze, used as a trimming
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Sanglier
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It's name is French for wild boar. It was named for it's texture which is compact and wiry. It also has a very rough finish. It is usually created with mohair and worsted fibres.
Uses:
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Serpentine Crepe
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It's filling has a twisted thread therefor giving it a Crepy effect. The size of the Crepe thread determines the texture. It is executed in a variety of fibres including manufactured ones.
Uses:
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Shadowy Organdy
Fibre:
Weave:
Characteristics: It is lightweight, crisp and sheer. The shadowy effect is produced when one colour is repeatedly printed on itself.
Uses:
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Zephyr
Fibre:
Weave: Plain
Characteristics: It's name comes from the ancient God of the Winds Zephrus. The quality of the textile is airy and can be found today in wool, cotton and manufactured fibres.
Uses:
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